Gelato, Gelato … Gelato?

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In Italian, the word “gelato” means “frozen” more than it means “ice cream.” So, for as much as we have heard that gelato is the Italian equivalent of ice cream, this “gelato” is really a frozen mousse of a dessert. Quick and easy, with no ice cream maker needed, this dessert may be served as a chilled mousse or frozen completely as a “gelato.”

I learned this recipe from Nonna and I have made it my own by adding raspberries. I think the berries are perfect for summer and I don’t think Nonna (Angiola Maria Novella Bonomi) would disapprove.

Buon Appetito~

Mark

Frozen Mascarpone with Chocolate & Raspberries

Dolce Gelato al Mascarpone Gelato

3 large eggs (*)

1 cup powdered sugar

12 ounces mascarpone cheese

2 ounces dark chocolate (between 60% to 72% cacao), finely chopped

1 teaspoon instant espresso powder

Pinch of salt

1 pint fresh raspberries, divided (1/2 pint to stir into the gelato and the other 1/2 pint reserved to use as garnish)

Separate the egg yolks from the whites, placing the yolks in a large bowl and the whites in a medium bowl. Set the bowl of whites aside.

Add the powdered sugar to the egg yolks and beat until well blended. Next, add the mascarpone, in batches, mixing well between each addition. Add the chocolate and espresso, stirring until well combined. Set aside.

Add the salt to the egg whites and whip to firm, but not stiff, peaks.

Using a spatula, gently fold the whipped whites into the mascarpone mixture until incorporated. Gently fold in half of the raspberries until mixed in, being careful not to break the raspberries.

Pour into individual dessert cups, covering each with plastic wrap, and place in the freezer for 2 hours until firm like a mousse – or – pour mixture into a 2-quart plastic container with lid, place in the freezer for 8 hours and, using an ice cream scoop, place into serving dishes, garnish with the reserved raspberries and serve.

Serves 8 to 10.

(*)Please take note that the eggs used in this recipe, though they do get frozen, are not cooked. If you have concerns about using raw eggs, use pasteurized eggs, which may be found at most grocery stores or health-minded food stores.

Notice: The consumption of raw or undercooked eggs, meat, poultry, seafood or shellfish may increase your risk of food borne illness.

This recipe and others are available on Mark’s Beyond the Pasta app for iPad, iPhone and iPod on iTunes.

About the Author

Mark LeslieMark Leslie, seen cooking on NBC’s "The Today Show" and Hallmark Channel's "Home & Family," loves to cook for anyone with an appetite, vacations in Italy every year, and lives to eat his way through every plate of pasta and cone of gelato placed before him. His first book, “Beyond the Pasta: Recipes, Language & Life with an Italian Family,” tells of his life in Italy while cooking with an Italian grandmother. He shares his food experiences on his blog at www.beyondthepasta.com and has taught cooking classes in California, Georgia, Minnesota, Texas, and across Alabama. While judging for high school culinary events, he was chosen by the US Department of Education to judge for their "National Education Startup Challenge." Mark can be regularly seen cooking on NBC-affiliate, WSFA-TV 12's "Alabama Live! each Friday, bringing easy, locally sourced recipes to central Alabama. His iTunes app “Beyond the Pasta” features helpful videos and more of Nonna’s family-style recipes that she shared with him, plus, upon its release, it was named “New & Noteworthy” by Apple. DaVinci Wines chose Mark as their "2012 Storyteller" in Language Arts—where they sent him to Vinci, Italy, to write about wine, food and life. Mark, his home and book have been featured in such national publications and blogs as House Beautiful, Paula Deen, Food Republic, The Kitchn, Apartment Therapy, Field & Stream, and The Daily Meal. A Chicago-area native and “Yankee” by birth, Mark has lived in Alabama for over 24 years, and celebrates the fact that he started life eating farina, progressed to grits, and finally arrived at polenta. Buonissimo!View all posts by Mark Leslie →

"Beyond the Pasta" is owned and operated by Mark Leslie. Unless otherwise specified all content, writing, recipes and photography is original and held in copyright through the Library of Congress. It may not be used without the express written consent of Mark Leslie.