All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘viterbo’

Lesson Number 2~

Nonna cooks Pollo con Limone~ Recently, I received an e-mail from Alessandra filling me in on all the happenings back in Viterbo. I mailed the Feb House Beautiful with the article on our house (http://www.mark-leslie.net/2010-starts-with-a-bang) to them back in early January and, when I hadn’t heard from them, I sent an e-mail making sure that they had received the magazine. …

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La Parola del Giorno~ The Word of the Day~

STUPEFACENTE~ This is one of my favorite Italian words, if only for the fact that it is one of the few words I know to express astonishment. The word is pronounced “stoop-ay-fah-CHEN-tay” and you can no doubt see that it is similar to the English word “stupefying,” so you already know how to translate it. Lately, “stupefacente” has been swimming …

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Lesson Number 1:

 Le presento Nonna~ The New Year has started and we are all in a deep freeze. It is time to warm up with a little video of Nonna. To bring everyone up to speed: Nonna is the grandmother of the family that I lived with in Viterbo, Italy, in 2005 through a university program in Siena (http://www.dantealighieri.com/italian_language_school_viterbo.html). She is the …

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‘Tis the Season…

See and download the full gallery on posterous The last tree~ Since my return from our Italian vacation at the beginning of November, I have been working for friends at their quite popular flower shop in Birmingham, Alabama (http://www.flowerbudsinc.com/).  We have been decorating houses for Christmas—the first house was on November 15 and today was the last house. There is …

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La Parola del Giorno–The Word of the Day–via France, Venice, and Oxford

Cazzo~ In high school I studied French—well, it would be closer to the truth to say that I sat in a class for three years where the teacher and two other students spoke French, while the rest of us were just thankful to not have to take Spanish from the hateful Seńora. Regardless of one’s age, when learning a new …

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Tutti a tavola~

Gobble, gobble, gobble… Thanksgiving is upon us and there is nothing Italian about this very American holiday—well, except that it is a time when families gather together to eat a single meal. In that sense, Thanksgiving is very Italian. Tacchino (pronounced “tahk-keen-oh”) is the Italian word for turkey and, surprisingly, Italians eat a lot of turkey. I always think of …

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Siamo a Viterbo–We are in Viterbo

Ciao ciao tutti! We arrived last night in Vitero and caught Nonna leaving the house to go to Boy Scouts (which in Italian is “masi”–I need to double check that spelling when I have more time). It is interesting to be staying in the house and writing on the same computer that I used 4 years ago to send home …

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Italia or bust…

We’re off on the road to Viterbo~ “Pronto.” Nonna answered the phone this morning when I called the house in Viterbo. Italians do not say “Hello” or “Good Morning” when they answer the phone—they say “Pronto.” It literally translates as “ready.” Hmmm, that doesn’t seem quite right, but that is how the phone is answered. “Pronto” is only used when …

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“Home Sweet Home”

Home is where the heart is–but, is it? Working out of town is never easy. In the past twelve months, I have been out of town—literally out of the state of Alabama—for eight of those twelve. Colorado, New York, Minnesota, and currently, South Carolina have all been “home” to me since last October. Home has been on my mind a …

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La Parola del Giorno~ the Word of the Day

Disastro~ There are many Italian words whose meanings are obvious to us all. Their spellings are very similar to their English counterparts, which at times makes one believe that learning Italian could be an easy task. Trust me, it’s not: however, I will say that it should never stop anyone from trying to learn the language, or any foreign language …

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